Displaying records 4 through 28 of the 55007 records found
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Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.4 百喻經·Introduction/4 答曰:
“生者言:‘有。’
死者言:‘無。’
故說:
‘或有或無。’”
The Buddha replied as follows:
"When something lives one says: 'it exists'.
and when something is dead one says: 'it does not exist'.
That is why one says:
'It may exist or it may not exist.'"
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.5 百喻經·Introduction/5 問曰:
“人從何生。”
答曰:
“人從穀而生。”
問曰:
“五穀從何而生。”
答曰:
“五穀從四大火風而生。”
They asked as follows:
"What does man originate from."
The Buddha replied as follows:
"Man originates from grain."
They asked as follows:
"What do the five kinds of grain originate from?"
The Buddha replied as follows:
"The five kinds of grain arise from the Four Elements, from Fire and Air."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.6 百喻經·Introduction/6 問曰:
四大火風從何而生。
答曰:
四大火風從空而生。
問曰:
空從何生。
答曰:
從無所有生。
問曰:
無所有從何而生。
答曰:
“從自然生。”
The brahmans asked as follows:
"What do the elements, Fire and Air originate from?"
The Buddha replied as follows:
"The elements Fire and Air arise from Emptiness."
The brahmans asked as follows:
What does Emptiness originate from?"
The Buddha replied as follows:
"It arises from where there is nothing."
The brahmans asked as follows:
"Where does 'where there is nothing' originate from?
The Buddha replied as follows:
"It originates from what is naturally so."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.7 百喻經·Introduction/7 問曰:
“自然從何而生。”
答曰:
“從泥洹而生。”
The brahmans asked as follows:
"Where does what is naturally so originate from?"
The Buddha answered as follows:
"It originates from Nirvāna."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.8 百喻經·Introduction/8 問曰。
“泥洹從何而生。”
佛言:
“汝今問事
何以爾深。
泥洹者是不生不死法。”
The brahmans asked as follows:
"What does Nirvana originate from?"
The Buddha spoke as follows:
"As you now ask about matters,
why do you go so deep into it?
Nirvāna is a dharma that goes beyond life and death."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.9 百喻經·Introduction/9 問曰:
“佛泥洹未?”
答曰。
“我未泥洹。”
“若未泥洹
云何得知泥洹常樂。”
The brahmans asked as follows:
"Have you, the Buddha, reached Nirvāna or not yet?"
The Buddha replied as follows:
"I have not yet reached Nirvāna."
"But if you have not yet reached Nirvāna,
how can you know that Nirvāna is eternal bliss?"
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.10 百喻經·Introduction/10 佛言:
“我今問汝:
‘天下眾生為苦為樂?’”
答曰。
“眾生甚苦。”
The Buddha said:
"Now I will ask you:
'The various creatures of this world, do they live in bitterness or in delight?"
The brahmans replied as follows:
"The various creatures suffer intense bitterness."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.11 百喻經·Introduction/11 佛言:
“云何名苦。”
答曰:
“我見眾生死時苦痛難忍。
故知死苦。”
佛言:
“汝今不死。
亦知死苦。
我見十方諸佛不生不死,
故知泥洹常樂。”
The Buddha said:
"Why do you call this bitterness?"
The brahmans answered as follows:
"We see that when the various creatures die they suffer bitter pain and find it hard to bear,
thus we know that dying is bitter."
The Buddha said:
"You are not dead at this point,
but still you know that dying is bitter.
I have seen that the various Buddhas of the ten regions are neither born nor die,
therefore I know that Nirvāna is eternal bliss.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 0.0.0.0.0.12 百喻經·Introduction/12 五百梵志心開意解,
求受五戒。
悟須陀洹果,
復坐如故。
佛言:
“汝等善聽。
今為汝廣說眾喻。”
The five hundred brahmans were delighted and relieved,
and they sought to receive the Five Prohibitions.
They grasped the fruits of srotApanna (first step towards enlightenment),
and they sat down again, as before.
The Buddha said:
"You people listen carefullly to me.
Now I will at length expound for you the various parables."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 1.0.0.0.0.1 百喻經·愚人食鹽喻/1 昔有愚人,
至於他家。
主人與食,
嫌淡無味。
主人聞已,
更為益鹽。
既得鹽美
便自念言:
“所以美者,
緣有鹽故。
少有尚爾,
況復多也!
Once upon a time there was a fool
who went to another person's home.
The host gave him something to eat,
but he felt it tasted of nothing.
When the host heard this
he added some more salt for him.
When the salt was added, the food tasted quite good
and then the fool thought to himself as follows:
"The reason why it tastes so good
is all because of the salt.
If it is like this even with a small amount
how much more so with a still larger amount.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 1.0.0.0.0.2 百喻經·愚人食鹽喻/2 愚人無智,
便空食鹽。
食已口爽,
返為其患。
The fool was devoid of wisdom
and so he just ate salt.
When he had eaten this, his mouth felt uncomfortable
and contrary to his intentions the salt became his misfortune.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 1.0.0.0.0.3 百喻經·愚人食鹽喻/3 譬彼外道,
聞節飲食可以得道,
即便斷食。
或經七日,
或十五日;
徒自困餓,
無益於道。
如彼愚人:
以鹽美故而空食之。
致令口爽。
此亦復爾。
The fool stands for those dissenters:
They hear that by controlling what they drink and eat they can obtain the Buddhist Way
and so they cut off nourishment.
Some survive for seven days,
others survive for fifteen days.
to no good purpose they make themselves miserable and hungry,
and they make no progress towards the Buddhist Way.
They are like that fool:
Because of the good taste of salt he went ahead and ate nothing else.
He caused his mouth to feel uncomfortable,
and this is also like the case of the dissenters.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 2.0.0.0.0.1 百喻經·愚人集牛乳喻/1 昔有愚人,
將會賓客;
欲集牛乳,
以擬供設;
而作是念:
「我今若預於日日中𤚲取牛乳,
牛乳漸多。
卒無安處。
或復酢敗。
不如即就牛腹盛之,
待臨會時
當頓𤚲取。」
Once upon a time there was a fool
who was about to assemble a group of guests,
in preparation for this he wanted to collect buffalo milk,
and thus he was planning to provide this for his guests.
On the occasion he had the following thought:
"If I now in preparation for this day every mid-day I milk the buffalo
the buffalo milk will become more and more.
Then suddenly at some point there will be no place to put the milk,
or again the milk will go sour.
It will be best to just leave it filling up the buffalo's belly.
I shall wait until the time for our reunion comes
and will then take out the milk at one go."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 2.0.0.0.0.2 百喻經·愚人集牛乳喻/2 作是念已,
便捉牸牛母子,
各繫異處。
卻後一月,
爾乃設會,
迎置賓客。
方牽牛來。
欲𤚲取乳。
而此牛乳即乾無有。
時為眾賓或瞋或笑。
When he had made these thoughts
he then got hold of a buffalo, mother and daughter,
and tied them up, each in a different place.
And then, one month later,
only at that time did he set up his party
and he received and placed his guests.
Only then did he pull along the buffalo
and he wanted to milk her.
But the milk of this buffalo had already dried up and there was none left.
At this time he was either stared at angrily or laughed at by the guests.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 2.0.0.0.0.3 百喻經·愚人集牛乳喻/3 愚人亦爾。
欲修布施,
方言:
「待我大有之時,
然後頓施。」
未及聚頃,
或為縣官水火盜賊之所侵奪,
或卒命終,
不及時施。
彼亦如是。
The fools are also like this:
they wish to cultivate the making of donations,
and then they say:
Let's wait until I have a lot of the stuff,
and only then will I make the donations at one go.
Before they have accumulated the stuff
it may be either taken away by district officials, or by floods or fires, or by thieves or robbers,
or indeed they may suddenly meet death,
and do not at the proper time make their donations.
That person (in the above story) is the same as these.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 3.0.0.0.0.1 百喻經·以梨打破頭喻/1 昔有愚人
頭上無毛。
時有一人
以梨打頭。
乃至二三
悉皆傷破。
時此愚人默然忍受,
不知避去。
傍人見已
而語之言:
何不避去
乃住受打
致使頭破。
Once upon a time there was a fool
who had no hair on his head.
At that time there was a person
who beat his head with a piece of pear-wood.
When he had done this two or three times,
he had completely smashed the head.
At the time the fool endured the situation without saying a word.
He did not have the good sense to escape.
When a bystander saw this
they spoke to him as follows:
"Why aren't you leaving the scene
but stay put and expose yourself to this beating
to the point where you get your head smashed.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 3.0.0.0.0.2 百喻經·以梨打破頭喻/2 愚人答言:
「如彼人者憍慢恃力
癡無智慧。
見我頭上無有髮毛,
謂為是石。
以梨打我頭破乃爾。」
傍人語言:
「汝自愚癡。
云何名彼以為癡也。
汝若不癡,
為他所打,
乃至頭破,
不知逃避?」
The fool replied as follows:
People like these are arrogant and throw their weight about.
They are stupid and have no wisdom.
They see that there is no hair on my head,
and they consider it to be a stone.
So they smash my head with a pear-tree stick, that's how it was."
The bystander said:
"You're silly as hell yourself!
How can you call these people names and consider them to be silly?
If you were not silly,
then would you have been beaten by them,
and would it have got to the point where your head was smashed,
without your finding a way of escaping?
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 3.0.0.0.0.4 百喻經·以梨打破頭喻/4 比丘亦爾。
不能具修信戒聞慧;
但整威儀,
以招利養。
如彼愚人,
被他打頭,
不知避去,
乃至傷破;
反謂他癡。
此比丘者亦復如是。
The monks are also like this:
they are unable to practise asceticism, to be faithful to prohibitions and to listen to wisdom.
all they sort out is their external impressive behaviour
in order to attract beneficial sustenance.
Just like that fool
who suffers his head being beaten by others:
he does not know to get away
and even gets to the point of being severely injured.
And still he imagines others are silly.
These monks are just the same.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.1 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/1 昔有愚人,
其婦端正;
情甚愛重,
婦無貞信。
後於中間共他交往,
邪淫心盛,
欲逐傍夫,
捨離己婿。
Once upon a time there was a fool,
and his wife was outwardly neat and proper,
as for his feelings for her he loved her intensely,
but the wife lacked chaste good faith.
Afterwards, in the meantime, she had relations with other men,
and her wicked lecherousness got stronger.
She desired to team up with a lover
so as to separate from her own husband.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.2 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/2 於是密語一老母言:
“我去之後,
汝可齎一死婦女屍安著屋中。
語我夫言
云我已死。”
At this point she secretly told an old lady:
"After I am gone,
you should provide the dead body of a lady and place her in the house,
and you you must talk to my husband
and say that I have died."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.2 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/2 老母於後伺其夫主不在之時,
以一死屍
置其家中。
及其夫還,
老母語言:
“汝婦已死。”
The old women waited until a time when her master, the husband, was not at home
and she took a dead body
and put it in his home.
When the husband returned,
the old woman told him:
"Your wife has died."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.3 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/3 夫即往視,
信是己婦。
哀哭懊惱。
大𧂐薪油,
燒取其骨;
以囊盛之,
晝夜懷挾。
The husband then went out to have a look
and indeed it turned out (to his mind) to be his own wife.
He grieved and lamented, and he was deeply upset.
On a large scale he assembled firewood and oil
and he burnt her, and took away her bones
and put them into a bag.
Day and night he kept the bones on his bosom.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.4 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/4 婦於後時心厭傍夫。
便還歸家。
語其夫言:
“我是汝妻”。
The woman, after this, got fed up with her lover
and so she returned to her home.
She told her husband:
"I am your wife."
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.5 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/5 夫答之言:
“我婦久死。
汝是阿誰
妄言我婦。”
乃至二三
猶故不信。
The husband replied to her and declared:
"My wife has died a long time ago
Who are you?
to baselessly claim you are my wife."
Right until she brought this up several times
but still her husband would not believe her.
Go to Record in Question  Middle Chinese BAIYU 4.0.0.0.0.6 百喻經·婦詐稱死喻/6 如彼外道
聞他邪說,
心生惑著,
謂為真實。
永不可改。
雖聞正教,
不信受持。
He is like those dissenters
who, having heard deviant preachings
produce confused intellectual attachments in their minds,
and they wrongly consider these to be true
and to be permanently impossible to improve on.
Even if they do hear the true teaching
they will not believe in it or accept it.
 
Displaying records 4 through 28 of the 55007 records found
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